Urinary Tract Infections

Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are surprisingly common in pets. The American Kennel Club estimates that 14% of all dogs will get a UTI sometime in their lives. Although seen more in older cats, it’s thought that about 10% of all cats will get one or more UTIs. Central Virginia Veterinary Clinic in Louisa, VA, lists what you need to know about UTIs in pets.

Urinary Tract Infections

Causes of Pet Urinary Tract Infections

UTIs are usually caused by bacteria. They get into the urethra and go up into the bladder. Some UTIs may be caused by disease, while some others are caused by bladder stones.

Signs of Urinary Tract Infections in Pets

The signs of a UTI in dogs and cats are pretty clear. They include:

  • Pets dribbling urine
  • Urine that has a very strong scent
  • Pets that try to urinate and cannot or only produce a few drops
  • Pets may walk around in a hunched posture or have their ears and tails down more often than usual
  • Pets that cry or whine when trying to urinate
  • Pets lick their genitals frequently to clean themselves and to try and get themselves to urinate.

Urinary tract infections are painful. If your pet shows the above signs, please take him or her to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Warning: Not Urinating at All for One Day is a Medical Emergency

If your pet has not produced any urine at all for one day or more, he or she needs to be rushed to an emergency vet. Your pet is at risk of having his or her bladder burst. Your pet is also being poisoned from all of the toxins in his or her urine. Pets that cannot urinate only have, at most, a few days to live.

Pets at Risk of Getting UTIs

Some kinds of dogs and cats are more prone to getting UTIs than others. They include diabetic pets, senior female pets, and pets with bladder stones or a history of bladder stones.

Diagnosing Urinary Tract Infections in Pets

Our veterinarian will need to examine a urine sample from your pet. Our vet looks at many things in the urine sample such as the presence of bacteria, blood, minute crystals that can cause stones or excess glucose. Your vet will use a device called a refractometer to determine how concentrated the urine is.

Treating Urinary Tract Infections in Pets

Usually, the first step is putting the pet on an antibiotic, and possibly painkillers. Any medical conditions like diabetes or bladder stones then need to be treated.

Still Have Questions?

If you have further questions about urinary tract infections in pets and live in the Louisa, VA area, contact Central Virginia Veterinary Clinic by calling (540) 967-1404 to make an appointment today.

 

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Monday
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In observance of the Thanksgiving holiday we will be closed Wednesday, November 25th - Sunday, November 29th. We will resume regular business hours on Monday, November 30th.
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